My First Video.

I posted my first video to youtube! It just showcases my bracelets. I enjoyed arranging this video, but don’t really care for some of the new changes in Movie Maker. It seems like you used to be able to do a lot more with Movie Maker. Oh well, it was fun. Check it out and like it (if you have four minutes to spare). Thanks in advance!

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Easter and other written wordaerobics.

I was reading some bios on the freebie jewelry projects I get from an online blog and was turned off by how heavy it was with artist self-aggrandizement.

“I like an urban tribal look. As manufacturers started coming out with more and more interesting materials and chains, I responded and started incorporating them into my seed bead work. As an art form, there is a very feminine aspect to Steampunk, as well. Even with the growing interest in Gothic and vampiric ephemera, Steampunk is there in the shadows — no pun intended!”

Bla bla, bla bla, bla. And what the bleepety bleep is “urban tribal?” (Yeah, yeah, I know, and what the hell is bleepety bleep?) And this person’s jewelry prices are in the hundreds, upwards of six hundred dollars, to be exact. Six hundred? Am I missing something? Beadwoven Steampunk jewelry? Hey, I like Steampunk jewelry. But get real! Are you paying for the name? I like my name, but it ain’t that special!

I solemnly swear, and everyone who reads this post is my witness, that I will never get so freakishly serious about my craft that I feel the need to convince people that my jewelry is so special, I have to charge so much that you feel like a Hollywood celebrity when you wear it. I charge what the piece is worth, plus a little extra for my time. If you buy it, then that tells me that you like it, and that’s good enough for me.

On a different note, happy Easter! Despite all the political craziness and all the militant PC’s out there trying to bust everything worth celebrating, I still call it Easter. So, happy Easter!

I celebrated by creating this very, complex, wire-wrapped piece that incorporates new-found objects in the shape of bunny rabbits and glass beads. I feed my need to bead by mixing my metals, which I consider to be a fascinating technique that requires a refined crafting palette in order so as never to mix the wrong two metals with the wrong new-found objects. (Ha, ha, couldn’t help myself.)

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I used silver-plated pewter bunnies,

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freshwater pearls,

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sterling silver,

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czech glass beads,

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silver beads, and a sterling silver lobster clasp.

Have Fun with Color This Spring

Spring is a great time to open your eyes and take in the abundance of color blooming all around you. Even if it’s just new leaves budding in the trees. After a long, grey winter, it’s hard to take the vibrant green hues of leaves for granted. Click the images below to get a better view of what’s new with Whispering Iris this Spring.

 
 
   
 

Just in time for spring, and it’s gone!

Spring is around the corner, and for this wonderful season, my goal is to make robin nest earrings and necklaces. I embarked on this journey with the piece shown below. However, when I relinquished it to the public eye, someone fell in love with it, purchased it, and now it’s on its way to its new owner!

This piece was created with bare copper, which was oxidized lightly. I wanted to create a nest that was deep but not too deep that it wouldn’t sit gracefully when worn. I also wanted to incorporate colors that relate to the robin. I used faceted dark-blue agate, quartz, and red jasper for the chain. I included the red jasper because it’s reminiscent of the robin’s breast. The turquoise beads in the nest represent, of course, robin eggs.

The chain was hand wrapped. Unfortunately, I don’t know what the drop stone is on the pendant. I thought the colors of the stone fit well with the color scheme of the design. The closure is also handmade, hammered copper with a link chain for adjustable length.

The idea of a robin’s nest pendant is not my own. They are quite popular among wire jewelers. Most handmade nests I’ve seen are made flat and are sparse on the wire at the base of the nest. I assume it is designed this way so that it hangs nicely. I was inspired to design a nest that reflects the robin’s nest more closely without being too bulky.

I had fun making this piece and can’t wait to get started designing more robin nests. I will post my new creations in the coming weeks.