Easter and other written wordaerobics.

I was reading some bios on the freebie jewelry projects I get from an online blog and was turned off by how heavy it was with artist self-aggrandizement.

“I like an urban tribal look. As manufacturers started coming out with more and more interesting materials and chains, I responded and started incorporating them into my seed bead work. As an art form, there is a very feminine aspect to Steampunk, as well. Even with the growing interest in Gothic and vampiric ephemera, Steampunk is there in the shadows — no pun intended!”

Bla bla, bla bla, bla. And what the bleepety bleep is “urban tribal?” (Yeah, yeah, I know, and what the hell is bleepety bleep?) And this person’s jewelry prices are in the hundreds, upwards of six hundred dollars, to be exact. Six hundred? Am I missing something? Beadwoven Steampunk jewelry? Hey, I like Steampunk jewelry. But get real! Are you paying for the name? I like my name, but it ain’t that special!

I solemnly swear, and everyone who reads this post is my witness, that I will never get so freakishly serious about my craft that I feel the need to convince people that my jewelry is so special, I have to charge so much that you feel like a Hollywood celebrity when you wear it. I charge what the piece is worth, plus a little extra for my time. If you buy it, then that tells me that you like it, and that’s good enough for me.

On a different note, happy Easter! Despite all the political craziness and all the militant PC’s out there trying to bust everything worth celebrating, I still call it Easter. So, happy Easter!

I celebrated by creating this very, complex, wire-wrapped piece that incorporates new-found objects in the shape of bunny rabbits and glass beads. I feed my need to bead by mixing my metals, which I consider to be a fascinating technique that requires a refined crafting palette in order so as never to mix the wrong two metals with the wrong new-found objects. (Ha, ha, couldn’t help myself.)

100_3184

I used silver-plated pewter bunnies,

100_3190

freshwater pearls,

100_3187

sterling silver,

100_3186

czech glass beads,

100_3188

silver beads, and a sterling silver lobster clasp.

A Happy Customer

I’m very lucky. Today I sold a very special bracelet to a special customer who sounds like he will be getting a lot of use out of it! I included some dark chocolate covered goodies with my delivery!

This bracelet was one that I made some time back. I added two extra beaded beads to adjust the length. It has jade-colored faceted glass rectangle beads and swarovski crystals. The beaded beads have died magnesite, faceted, fire-polished glass beads, and seed beads.    I hope my customer enjoys this piece!

100_2384100_1895

Beaded, freshwater pearl necklace with a drop focal bead.

A few weeks ago I added a post about the beads that people find and give to me, Beads I get from others. My intention was to do follow up posts showcasing how I’ve used these little gifts to make necklaces, bracelets, earrings and rings.

Below are some pictures of a beaded necklace I’ve managed to complete.

 

My brother bestowed the focal bead to me; a really cool, multi-colored, pressed glass bead. It even has some sparkle in it. I stowed it away for weeks not sure what I wanted to do with it. The bead is a large drop bead, so I knew it had to be a focal piece.

I thought about what colors I should use to help it stand out. Did I want to use light greens to add attention to the darker greens in the bead? No, too much green. Did I want to go avant garde with some vibrant oranges and dark blues? No, the bead also has some rose-colored hues in it, which would pair well with orange, but with the greens and blues might be a little like a drunken clown at your local town fair. Nothing against clowns, folks; just a little scary when they’re drunk is all I’m saying.  Continue reading